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Oct 25th 2021 / General Stone Care

The Best Material for a Bar Countertop

Adding a bar can change the dynamics of any setting. It's also a multi-purpose addition as you can use it to entertain guests, add visual appeal, or a place for fun or relaxation. Adding a bar would also mean choosing a suitable countertop material. So, what are your options? Well, below are some of the best ones.

Granite

The beauty of granite is that it's available in different styles and colors. And this allows you to have greater flexibility or options when it comes to the look of your bar countertop. Whether it's a luxurious late-night lounge, the neighborhood hang-out, or a home bar, you can bet that there's granite that goes well with it.

Granite is also a natural stone, meaning that every slab of granite is unique, and no one in the world has the same piece as yours. Perhaps granite's most attractive property is its high durability, which makes it perfect for a high-traffic area. On top of that, cleaning and maintenance are a breeze.

Onyx

Because onyx is considered by many as an exotic stone, it often exuberates a stunning impression. It's the breathtaking appearance of having parallel layers of contrasting colors are formed naturally across thousands of years. Onyx is also a stone that has mesmerized ancient civilizations. The Egyptians and Greeks are fond of using onyx for carvings and jewelry. For a bar countertop, onyx has an ace up its sleeve. Because of its translucency, you have the option of having a backlight that will take your bar countertop to the next level.

Keep in mind that onyx is not a very durable stone. Hence, it's best to use it if you don't expect high traffic.

Slate

Slate is classified as a metamorphic rock, which means it used to be a different kind of rock before nature transformed it to its present state. For the case of slate, it used to be a shale stone, which is a mixture of mostly clay and other minerals such as calcite and quartz.

The excellent thing about using slate is that it has a low water absorption rate, which is why it's also popular as a roofing material. In other words, slate is an excellent choice for a bar countertop as it's both attractive and durable.

Gemstone

Gemstone is another mineral crystal that has been used for centuries as jewelry because of its extraordinary beauty. Museums and hotels commonly use it because of its aesthetic appeal. It's also a bar countertop that you can backlight to make a one-of-a-kind impression. If you are aiming for something that has a luxury and high-class appeal, then using gemstone is an excellent choice. However, it's not a very durable stone, so it's best to use it for low-traffic areas.

Marble

Marble is another metamorphic rock that has been widely known for hundreds of years. It's commonly used as sculptures and for buildings like the New York Public library. If there's one attribute that marble is known for, then it's timeless elegance. When used as a bar countertop, the calm appearance and subtle veins of marble add an aura of luxury.

Marble is an excellent choice if you are going for something with a relaxed atmosphere and you don't expect a lot of traffic. Keep in mind that marble must be adequately sealed at all times. Acidic beverages and wine don't bode well for unsealed marble.

Quartz

If you expect a very high amount of traffic, then it's likely that you will need an engineered stone. And, perhaps the best candidate for such purposes is manufactured quartz. With engineered quartz, you have a myriad of colors and styles to choose from, making it easy to fit into any theme you have in mind.

Another attractive property of quartz is its non-porous, which means it rarely stains and requires no or minimal sealing. It will retain its look for years.

Wrapping It All Up

Nowadays, you have plenty of options when it comes to the kind of material you can use for your bar countertop. If you want the cream of the crop, then your options are:

  • Granite
  • Onyx
  • Slate
  • Gemstone
  • Marble
  • Quartz

Keep in mind that the materials mentioned above have their own sets of pros and cons. Hence, it's best to use the kind of stone that best serves the primary purpose of your bar.